Judge rules that fracking risks were illegally overlooked

A court in California has ruled that the issuing of oil and gas leases broke the law because it did not take into account the dangers of fracking, including potential water contamination .  The leases cover 2500 acres of land and are estimated to contain 64% of the United States’ shale oil reserves.  Like shale gas, shale oil is only economically obtainable by using high volume hydraulic fracturing (fracking).  The court found that the Bureau of Land Management violated US environmental law by not carrying out a full environmental impact study.  It was also pointed out that the exploitation of fossil fuels such as shale oil and gas are in conflict with California’s policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and slow down catastrophic climate change.

We hope that this cautionary tale will warn our own administration not to make hurried, costly and dangerous decisions that will threaten the economic, health and environmental futures of the people of Fermanagh and Northern Ireland.  Visit our What can I do? page to find out more about how you can make your voice heard.

Read the full article here: Judge rules administration overlooked fracking risks in California mineral leases | Reuters.

[picture from the Reuters article, copyright Reuters/Marco Anzuoni]

 

Merry Christmas

Very best wishes to all, in Fermanagh and beyond, from the Fermanagh Fracking Awareness Network, for a joyful Christmas and a New Year of peace, prosperity and hope. Special thanks to all those friends who have supported our work in 2012 and helped us to raise awareness of what shale gas extraction and frackiing could mean for our beautiful county.  Please keep on spreading the word to your friends, your family, your neighbours, community leaders and political representatives.

And over the Christmas break, if you can’t face The Great Escape yet again, why not watch the debate on fracking that was held in Stormont in September?  We’ve uploaded most of it to YouTube (watch it in the windows below) and the rest will follow in the New Year.

And finally, here’s an extra viewing of the vitally important part of the debate which shows that fracking in Fermanagh is especially unsafe and should not be permitted. Experts have stated that the separation between a fracking zone and an aquifer should be at least 600 metres. But here, we understand that the proposed distance from the fracking zone to the regionally important aquifer upon which many people’s drinking water depends, is only 500 metres. We think this is an important issue which the people in Fermanagh deserve to know about. If you agree, please share it with others.

Have a merry Christmas and a peaceful and happy New Year.

 

Tyndall updated report

John Tyndall, the great (Irish born) 19th century physicist

The updated Tyndall Centre report on the environmental and climate change impacts of shale gas extraction has recently been released, and makes for sobering reading (which is why we’ve added a picture of Prof. Tyndall’s whiskers to cheer you up).  The key conclusions of the report are as follows:

1.There is little to suggest that shale gas will play a key role as a transition fuel in the move to a low carbon economy. … At the global level, against a backdrop of energy growth matching, if not outstripping, that of global GDP and where there is currently no carbon constraint, the exploitation of shale gas will most likely lead to increased energy use and increased emissions resulting in an even greater chance of dangerous climate change.

2. UK Government commitments on climate change require major investment in zero and very low carbon technologies; this is likely to be delayed significantly by the exploitation of shale gas.

3. Without a meaningful cap on global carbon emissions, the exploitation of shale gas is likely to increase total emissions. … (I)n this energy-hungry world, with GDP growth dominating political agendas and no effective and stringent constraint on total global carbon emissions, the exploitation of an additional fossil fuel resource will likely feed increased energy use and an associated rise in emissions.

4. Evidence from the US suggests shale gas extraction brings a significant risk of groundwater and surface water contamination and until the evidence base is developed a precautionary approach to development in the UK and EU is recommended… An analysis of substances that have been used in the US suggests a significant number with toxic, carcinogenic, radiological or other hazardous properties.

5. Requirements for water in commercial scale shale gas extraction could put pressure on water supplies at the local level in the UK. Shale gas extraction requires high volumes of water. Given that water resources in many parts of the UK are already under pressure, this water demand could bring significant and additional problems at the local level. Conversely volumes of contaminated wastewater returning from wells will require careful disposal.

6. Exploiting shale gas within the UK is likely to give rise to a range of additional challenges. The UK is densely populated and consequently wells associated with commercial scale shale gas extraction will be relatively close to population centres. The proximity of such extraction will give rise to a range of local concerns for instance, high levels of truck movements on already busy roads and the potential for seismic disturbances, that require meaningful engagement, assessment, regulation and enforcement.

The full report, together with the Tyndall Centre’s earlier report from January 2011, is available on our Documents page.

Fracking vote delayed for the Delaware River basin

Fracking vote delayed | The News Journal | delawareonline.com.

The Delaware, on the Atlantic coast of the United States, is one of America’s largest and most important rivers, providing water to millions. Issues such as conservation, flood mitigation and development are decided by the Delaware River Basin Commission, which is made up of the four governors of Delaware, Pennyslvania, New Jersey and New York together with a representative of the US government (currently a Brigadier General from the Army Corps of Engineers).

A recent proposal to use hydraulic fracturing to extract shale gas from the river basin was to be voted on by the Commission this Monday, 21st November. However, following widespread concern, the Commission has cancelled its meeting, indicating that at least three of its five members are not happy with the prospect of fracking in this vital region. This is important news, not only for the residents of the four states, but for all those worldwide who have reservations about the process. There are serious doubts about the safety of hydraulic fracturing for human and animal health, the purity of drinking water and the preservation of precious landscapes. Now even state governors and brigadier generals are coming to share those concerns. Will our elected representatives take the issue equally seriously?