Fracking firm Tamboran obtains belcoo quarry injunction

The BBC have reported:

Tamboran Resources intends to drill an exploratory borehole near Belcoo next month to collect rock samples.

Since Monday, protesters against the controversial fracking technique have held a vigil at the site entrance.

Police say they have plans in place to deal with any protests.

The quarry is owned by Acheson and Glover and Tamboran has taken out a four-month lease to carry out exploratory drilling work.

The court order prohibits people from entering or occupying land at Gandrum Road, or preventing Tamboran from carrying out exploratory mining operations and obstructing access to and from the site.

Tamboran said that after they moved equipment into the quarry, a number of individuals sought to gain unlawful access to the site.

“In order to protect the safety of local people, site security and protesters we have sought and secured an order for an injunction to deter anyone from seeking unlawful access,” the company said.

“Tamboran respects people’s right to protest and we welcome calls from local people to ensure that the protests are peaceful.

“It is important to stress that the company is undertaking work it is required to do under the terms of the licence from government and intends to meet its obligations in full.”

To read the article in full, click here.

Tamboran cover letter for residents of Belcoo

When Tamboran Resources arrived in Belcoo in the early hours of the morning (5am), 21st July, residents were not only greeted with the sound of traffic, but also this cover letter through their letter box by 9am:

Tamboran Cover letter

The third paragraph from the bottom states:

“We know there has been a campaign against shale gas, and regret the amount of misinformation that this has generated.”

Thankfully, the Fermanagh Fracking Awareness Network double checks and references all our facts, such as the British Medical Journal, who have stated the following about unconventional shale gas extraction:

“To the extent that they are technically and economically feasible, risk reduction technologies that mitigate adverse health outcomes should be deployed. However reviewing the public health aspects of the development of the shale gas industry requires more than merely gesturing to technological improvements that lack empirical data on their effectiveness in the real world. The optimism that fail-safe engineering solutions can ensure safe shale gas development may result more from a triumph of marketing than a demonstration of experience.”

The Medical Journal of Australia who stated that:

Unconventional gas extraction is responsible for air pollution from diesel fumes from infrastructure development and stationary equipment, gas processing, venting and flaring. Fugitive methane emissions can catalyse development of ground level ozone and combine with PM to form smog, both of which contribute to respiratory disease, among other health effects, and damage to crops — gas- field haze is a well known effect in the US, with such pollution capable of travelling substantial distances. Shale gas extraction can also involve the flaring or venting of “associated” gases, which can become hazardous air pollutants.

And world renowned medical Journal, The Lancet who stated that despite scientific study of the health effects of fracking being in its infancy, “findings suggest that this form of extraction might increase health risks compared with conventional oil and gas extraction [due to] larger surface footprints of fracking sites; their close proximity to locations where people live, work and play; and the need to transport and store large volumes of materials.”

The Lancet went further to state that the, “risks of environmental contamination occur at all stages in the development of shale gas extraction.”

Whilst in fact the proposed exploratory borehole drill will not include any hydraulic fracturing, it is recognised as the first step towards the process of Unconventional Shale Gas Extraction in County Fermanagh.

Meetings in Belcoo and Cashel

If you live in or near Belcoo or Cashel, and would be interested in joining a local fracking awareness group, now is your opportunity!  Meetings will be held on Wednesday 29th February at 7.30pm in the Parish Centre, Belcoo and on Thursday 1st March at 7.00pm in the Community Centre, Cashel.  All are very welcome and we look forward to meeting you.