No fracking in Republic of Ireland until EPA study completed in 2016

Today, the Irish Times reported that the controversial process of Unconvenional Gas Exporation and Extraction (UGEE) will not proceed in the Republic of Ireland until a two year study by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is completed in 2016.

The all island research, conducted by authorities north and south of teh border, costing €1million is expected to undertake a literature review into the effects of the process on the environment, and may include environmental baseline studies.

You may read the full article here.

Public consultation on fracking research – your chance to speak

The Environmental Protection Agency in the Republic of Ireland has produced a terms of reference document setting out their proposals for a programme of research into “unconventional gas exploration and extraction”.  The steering committee for this research includes the Northern Ireland Environment Agency and the Geological Survey of Northern Ireland and it will be of great importance on both sides of the border.  To read the terms of reference please click here and to make your own submissions about it, please email UGEEconsultation@epa.ie before the deadline of March 8th.

FFAN

If you are concerned about this issue, as an individual or on behalf of a community group or other organisation, please use this opportunity to make your voice heard. You may wish to write a detailed response or simply to refer to question one on page two; ‘Can this technology be used whilst also fully protecting the environment and human health?’
For more details please read the EPA’s press release below.

Environmental Protection Agency, Ireland.

Rabbitte’s review

Rabbitte orders ‘fracking’ study – The Irish Times – Wed, Oct 05, 2011.

Important news from the Republic, where the Minister for Energy and Natural Resources has asked the Environmental Protection Agency to carry out a study of the various impacts of hydraulic fracturing before his government go any further in granting permits.  As he says,

“At present there is currently very little European experience of the process. For this reason I have asked the EPA to examine the area and advise me and [my] colleagues in Government on the environmental implications of fracking.”

This seems a sensible approach, and one which it might be wise for our own representatives to adopt.  What do you think?